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         Welcome to the


Convention of States Page.


 


Constitution of the United States of America:


Article V – The Congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three fourths of the several states, or by conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress; provided that no amendment which may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first article; and that no state, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate.


 


From the year of 1787 through today


The provisions of Article V of The United States Constitution for The Convention of States 


“In 1787, the U.S. Constitution’s framers created two methods of proposing amendments for state ratification in Article V. One empowered Congress to propose, because Congress would be familiar with the daily workings of government. The second was designed as a more popular procedure, one by which (as framer George Mason said) “amendments of the proper kind [could] be obtained by the people.” The idea was to enable the people, acting through their state legislatures, to address congressional inertia by proposing amendments through a method that bypassed Congress. The specific goal was to create a procedure to address possible federal dysfunction. Yet over two centuries later, that procedure has never been used to completion. When citizens and state legislatures neglect such a key civic right, government may become dysfunctional.”


Professor Robert G. Natelson is the Senior Fellow in Constitutional Jurisprudence at the Independence Institute in Denver. 


                                                                           www.conventionofstates.com


Please sign the petition in the COS Home page above.


      Share it with family and friends for their participation.


 


Contact your State Senators and Representatives to pass the Article V Convention of States Application, the legislation needed to make this happen.


 


The Application is limited to crafting Constitutional Amendments for the purpose of:


 


1.  Imposing fiscal restraints on the federal government,


 


2.  Limiting its power and jurisdiction, and


 


3.  Imposing term limits on its officials and members of Congress.


 


What Sorts of Amendments Could be Passed?


Examples of amendments that could be discussed:


 


A balanced budget amendment


 


• A redefinition of the General Welfare Clause (the original view was the federal government could not spend money on any topic within the jurisdiction of the states)


 


A redefinition of the Commerce Clause (the original view was that Congress was granted a narrow and exclusive power to regulate shipments across state lines–not all the economic activity of the nation)


 


A prohibition of using international treaties and law to govern the domestic law of the United States


 


A limitation on using Executive Orders and federal regulations to enact laws (since Congress is supposed to be the exclusive agency to enact laws)


 


Imposing term limits on Congress and the Supreme Court


 


Placing an upper limit on federal taxation


 


Requiring the sunset of all existing federal taxes and a super-majority vote to replace them with new, fairer taxes


 


 


STEPS FOR A SUCCESSFUL CONVENTION OF STATES


Step 1. YOU Sign the Petition.


In doing so, your petition will automatically be sent to your Senator and Representative in your state capital. Your contact information will also be forwarded to District Captain for your State legislative district. YOUR INFORMATION DOES NOT GO TO WASHINGTON DC. NOR IS YOUR INFORMATION SHARED OR SOLD.


 


Step 2. State Senator or State Representative sponsors the Application bill in the appropriate State Chamber (Senate or House).


YOUR vigilance here is to make sure the bill being sponsored is the exact Application being proposed by the Convention of States. If each State has its own unique Application, then reaching the required number of 34 States will never happen.


 


Step 3. State Senate or State House leadership assigns the Application bill to the appropriate committee for review, debate, and to schedule all appropriate hearings.


During this time, phone calls, emails, and letters to your State legislators are most affective. This is also when YOU need to be vigilant; making sure the Application is not altered or amended in committee work sessions. Any alterations or changes to the Application will render it void.


 


Step 4. Committee holds public hearings.


This is YOUR opportunity to testify before the committee either in favor of, or in opposition to the Application bill. This is also when all written comments from the public becomes part of the official record. After public comments, the committee will vote up or down to recommend passage of the bill to the full Chamber (Senate or House).


 


Step 5. Committee passes Application bill out of committee and refers the bill to the Chamber floor (Senate or House) for a vote.


This is usually a straight up-or-down vote by the full Chamber.


 


Step 6. Application bill goes to the other Chamber (House or Senate) where it is assigned to a committee for review, debate, and to schedule all appropriate hearings.


During this time, phone calls, emails, and letters to your State legislators are most affective. Once again, this is also when YOU need to be vigilant; making sure the Application is not altered or amended in committee work sessions. Any alterations or changes to the Application will render it void.


 


Step 7. Committee holds public hearings.


Once more, this is YOUR opportunity to testify before the committee either in favor of, or in opposition to the Application bill. Again, this is also when all written comments from the public becomes part of the official record. After public comments, the committee will vote up or down to recommend passage of the bill to the full Chamber (House of Senate).


 


Step 8. Committee passes Application bill out of committee and refers the bill to the Chamber floor (House or Senate) for a vote.


This is usually a straight up-or-down vote by the full Chamber. The Application is now complete.


 


Step 9. Application is sent to the President and Secretary of the United States Senate and to the Speaker and Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and copies to the members of the said Senate and House of Representatives from the respective State.  


Basically, they have been officially served notice.


 


Step 10.Date and location of the Convention of States is set by Congress once two thirds (34) States have completed Applications as described in Steps 1 through 8.


This is the only occasion involving the Federal Congress. All thirty four applications must be for the same purpose(s). 


 


Step 11.State Legislatures pick their delegates (commissioners) to the Convention.  


The number of delegates sent to the Convention is determined by each State. The Legislatures instruct their delegates of the States’ official position(s) on all topics to be considered at the Convention. The States reserve the right to recall any delegate not following the States’ instructions.


 


Step 12.Convention of States is convened.


All fifty States are represented. Delegates suggest Amendments for each of the proposed areas as stated in the Applications, and as instructed by their State Legislature. No Amendments not identified in the Application may be introduced. During this process, the delegates are in communication with their States. Each proposed Amendment must pass or fail on its own merit; no bundling, no piggy-backing.  To pass in the Convention, the proposed Amendment must receive a simple majority and meet the approval of their State legislatures. Note: no matter the size of its delegation, each State has only one vote on each proposed Amendment.


 


Step 13.The Convention is adjourned. 


 


Step 14.States vote to ratify or reject the proposed Amendments.


Each Amendment is considered individually and voted up or down. No alterations can be made. In order to be ratified an Amendment must be ratified by thirty-eight (38) States, just as any Amendment proposed by Congress. Amendments not ratified by thirty-eight States are dead.


 


Step 15.Ratified Amendments become a permanent part of the Constitution


The following posts are a Veteran’s view.


Part 1 – America. . . It ain’t over ’til the fat lady sings!


We the people are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.” Abraham Lincoln


http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/02/04/part-1-ame...


 


Part 2 America – The government’s canonization of the Marxist/socialist wet dream.


For those who believe gridlock in Washington DC is a bad thing, perhaps they should understand that it is the lack of gridlock that has our country so far in the hole we have to look up to see down!”


http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/02/19/part-2-ame...


 


Part 3 – Government, civics, and the 2nd Amendment in education


The man who will not obey it (the natural laws of mankind) will abandon his better self, and, in denying the true nature of a man will thereby suffer the severest of penalties, though he has escaped all the other consequences which men call punishments.” Cicero


http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/11/27/part-3-gov...


 


Part 4 – Second Amendment – End of story!


So, if people want to CHANGE what the Founding Fathers had in mind, let them amend the Constitution, not try to circumvent our rights with an endless parade of laws which have no effect on the criminal elements of society.”


http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/12/17/part-4-sec...


 


Part 5 America: Who’s Behind Convention of States Movement?


It is time to look at the people behind the movement to constitutionally wrest control of the federal government”


http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/03/27/part-5-ame...


 


 


   Current Status of COS Applications Across the U.S.


Total States that have filed the COS Resolution to Pass an Application: 44


 


Of those:


Total Passed States: 10


Indiana Louisiana Oklahoma Tennessee 


(2016) Alabama Alaska Georgia Florida


(2017) Arizona  North Dakota


 


Total House Wins: 16 (still need to pass in the Senate)


 


Total Senate Wins: 11 (still need to pass in the House)


That is a total of twenty-seven (27) Legislative Chambers that are waiting for the other body to take action.


 


Total States with Committee Wins: 26


If these twenty-four Chambers would simply vote for the Application, they would move to the “PASSED” column and there would be thirty-three (33) completed Applications. It only takes thirty-four (34) to call a Convention


 


2.7 million Petitions signed nationwide


  


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